My Blog
By McInerney Cares
August 27, 2021
Category: Pregnancy Care
Gestational DiabetesEven if you’ve never been diagnosed with diabetes, some women can develop diabetes during pregnancy. This is known as gestational diabetes and is often diagnosed by the 24th week of pregnancy. Gestational diabetes means that your blood sugar levels are too high. If left untreated this can lead to serious complications for both you and your baby, so you must discuss your gestational diabetes with your OBGYN so that you and your doctor can create an effective game plan.
 
Why does gestational diabetes occur?

The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, which helps your body store sugar from food to use for energy; however, when you are pregnant the placenta also produces hormones that can impact insulin levels and lead to insulin resistance. If your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, this can result in gestational diabetes.
 
What are the signs of gestational diabetes?

It is possible for a pregnant woman to have gestational diabetes and not even know it, which is why you should keep up with prenatal visits with your OBGYN so that they can perform the necessary testing to keep both you and your baby healthy throughout your pregnancy and delivery.
 
However, it is possible to develop symptoms (particularly if you have undiagnosed diabetes before getting pregnant). These symptoms include,
  • Blurry vision
  • Fatigue
  • Increased hunger and thirst
  • Urinating more often
Since these symptoms can also just be indicative of a healthy, normal pregnancy (aka: being hungrier than usual) these symptoms don’t necessarily mean that you have gestational diabetes. You must speak with your OBGYN about certain risk factors and keep up with your checkups so that gestational diabetes can be detected right away.
 
How is gestational diabetes treated?

Many women can improve their blood sugar levels through simple measures such as healthy eating, exercising regularly, managing stress, and monitoring their blood sugar levels. By controlling this issue now you can prevent gestational diabetes in the future, as well as the development of type 2 diabetes. Sometimes your doctor may also prescribe insulin medication to help control your blood sugar.
 
Your OBGYN’s goal is to provide you with proper care and treatment throughout your life, from general wellness checkups to post-natal and menopausal care. If you have concerns about gestational diabetes, or if you’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, talk with your OBGYN about the best way to keep it under control.
By McInerney Cares
August 06, 2021
Category: OBGYN Care
Tags: PPH   Postpartum Hemorrhage  
Postpartum HemorrhagePostpartum hemorrhage occurs when there is severe and prolonged bleeding of 500ml or more that occurs within 24 hours after giving birth. This often occurs after the placenta has been delivered and it may be more common in women who’ve had a cesarean rather than vaginal birth. Of course, there are steps your OBGYN can take during the third stage of labor to reduce a woman’s risk for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH).

Signs of PPH

It’s important to recognize the signs of PPH so you can call your OBGYN or 911 to get immediate medical attention. Some signs of PPH include,
  • Heavy vaginal bleeding that won’t stop
  • A drop in blood pressure (a sign of shock)
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Pale and/or clammy skin
  • Pain or swelling around the vagina
PPH is a life-threatening condition, so you mustn’t ignore these signs after giving birth.

Risk Factors for PPH

While PPH can happen without warning, there are risk factors that can predispose women to develop PPH. If you’ve had PPH in the past, you are more likely to have it in the future. PPH is also more common among Hispanic and Asian women.

You may also be more likely to develop PPH if you have any of these health problems,
  • Uterine atony: When the muscles of the uterus don’t contract or tighten there is nothing to stop the bleeding
  • Uterine inversion: When the uterus turns inside out during childbirth
  • Ruptured uterus: When the uterus tears during delivery (this is rare)
Other conditions and factors that can increase your risk include,
  • Conditions that impact the placenta such as placenta increta or placenta previa
  • Undergoing a C-section
  • Undergoing general anesthesia (often for a C-section)
  • Medicines that induce labor such as Pitocin
  • Vaginal tearing during childbirth
  • Fast labor (less than six hours if this isn’t your first child) or augmented labor (more than 14 hours if this is your first baby)
  • Placental infections
  • Preeclampsia
  • Gestational hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Blood conditions
If you have questions or concerns about childbirth or delivery, know that your OBGYN is always here to answer any of your questions. Talk through the possibility of PPH with your obstetrician so you can discuss beforehand, the steps that are going to be taken to protect both you and your baby during labor and delivery.
By McInerney Cares
July 26, 2021
Category: Women's Healthcare
Tags: Menopause   Osteoporosis  
OsteoporosisMenopause occurs when a woman no longer has her period for a full year. While menopause can occur in a woman’s 40s, these days the average age is 51 for women in the US. With the drop in estrogen production that occurs with menopause, many women experience hot flashes, vaginal dryness, night sweats, and other unpleasant symptoms. Of course, another concern that OBGYNs have for menopausal women is the onset of osteoporosis, a condition that causes a weakening of the bones.

Osteoporosis can happen to anyone

You don’t have to have a family history of bone disease to be impacted by osteoporosis. While a family history of bone disease can certainly put you more at risk, we also see many otherwise healthy women develop osteoporosis during their perimenopausal and menopausal years.

Other risk factors for osteoporosis include:
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Smoking
Menopause increases your risk for osteoporosis

While not all menopausal women will develop osteoporosis, one in two postmenopausal women will have osteoporosis. This is because estrogen protects the bones, and as estrogen production drops this also increases the chances for osteoporosis. It’s also important that women during this stage of life are getting enough calcium to keep their bones healthy.

If you aren’t sure that you are incorporating enough calcium into your diet, it’s important to talk with your OBGYN about whether or not to supplement. The body also needs enough vitamin D to absorb calcium, and with the number of Americans with vitamin D deficiency and suboptimal levels, it’s also important that you have your vitamin D levels checked regularly to make sure you are getting enough.

There are preventive measures you can take now

Most women assume that once they have osteoporosis there is nothing they can really do to prevent permanent damage. This is simply not true! Ways of strengthening and supporting good bone health include:
  • Getting regular exercise that includes weight-resistance training
  • Eating a healthy diet that includes enough calcium and vitamin D, as well as protein, magnesium, vitamin C, and vitamin K
  • Quitting smoking, if you are currently a smoker
  • Limiting alcohol consumption or avoiding it altogether
If you are at a higher risk for developing osteoporosis, you’ll want to talk with your OBGYN about the possible benefits of medications that can help to either prevent or manage osteoporosis.

If you are experiencing symptoms of menopause, you must have an OBGYN that you can turn to for care, support, and answers during this time. An OBGYN can also provide you with the right treatment options to help prevent and manage osteoporosis.
By McInerney Cares
July 13, 2021
Category: OBGYN Care
Tags: Maternal Age  
Maternal AgeIn the US, more and more women are deciding to have children later in life. Of course, as women wait until their mid-to-late 30s or even 40s to have children some certain risks and complications are more likely to occur during pregnancy. Women who become pregnant at or over the age of 35 years old are considered advanced maternal age (or a geriatric pregnancy). In these pregnancies, your OBGYN may deem you high risk, as certain issues are more likely to occur in older pregnant women over the age of 35.

Okay, so you just turned 35 years old. Should you be concerned about getting pregnant?

Well, not necessarily. It isn’t like everything changes overnight. OBGYNs have been providing care to pregnant women of all ages so they know that when it comes to assessing risk everyone’s needs are different. Just because a woman is 35 years old doesn’t necessarily mean that she will face challenges during pregnancy.

A lot of it has to do with her genetics, medical history, and current health. Women in their 30s and 40s who are in great health may not ever face complications or problems, but it’s still important to recognize these risks ahead of time so that you and your OBGYN can find ways to prevent them from happening.

Your Health is Key to Conception (and a Healthy Pregnancy)

Your health is going to play one of the biggest factors in conceiving after age 35; however, it is important to note that the number of eggs your body produces does decrease with age. The decline occurs in the early 30s with a more serious decline after 37 years old. So, does this mean that you won’t be able to conceive naturally?

Not necessarily. Some women can still easily become pregnant in their early 40s; however, if you’ve been trying to conceive for several months and you’re having trouble, it may be time to talk with your OBGYN.

Possible Complications in Advanced Maternal Age

Women who get pregnant after 35 years old are more at risk for developing certain complications such as high blood pressure or gestational diabetes. Pregnant women over 35 years old are also more likely to face ectopic pregnancies, Down syndrome and other genetic disorders, stillbirth, and preeclampsia.

It’s important to speak with your OBGYN if you are trying to conceive, as certain tests can be performed to check for chromosomal and genetic abnormalities. You may also need to come in more regularly for checkups throughout your pregnancy.

If you are thinking about becoming pregnant and you are over the age of 35, it’s a good idea to speak with your OBGYN to find out if there are certain things you can do before becoming pregnant to keep you healthy and less likely to face complications. Your OBGYN is going to be an integral part of the care you receive both before, during, and after your pregnancy.
By McInerney Cares
June 24, 2021
Category: OBGYN Care
Tags: Vaginal Agenesis  
Vaginal AgenesisVaginal agenesis is a rare congenital condition that impacts the development of a baby’s reproductive system. As a result, a baby girl may be born without certain reproductive organs or a vagina. While this condition may be diagnosed after your child is born, often this condition isn’t recognized until puberty. While young women with this condition will still go through puberty, they will not have a period and the majority will not be able to get pregnant. An OBGYN may be the first person to diagnose this condition and they will become a valuable part of you or your daughter’s treatment plan.
 
What causes vaginal agenesis?

While the genetic cause is still unknown, research has found that 90 percent of children with Mayer-von Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser’s Syndrome (MRKH) also have vaginal agenesis. This congenital disorder may vary from child to child. Some young girls may not have a vagina or uterus while other girls may have part of a uterus but no vagina.

We understand that this can be distressing for both the patient and their family. Despite this genetic abnormality, the patient is still considered female. Of course, this can be confusing and a lot to process, which is why an OBGYN can be a great doctor and specialist to turn to for help, support, and care during this time.

While most patients with vaginal agenesis will not be able to carry a child, if they do have a uterus then they can become pregnant when they choose to have a family. This is something that your OBGYN can discuss once the patient becomes an adult.
 
Are there treatment options for vaginal agenesis?

Additional testing may need to be performed by your gynecologist before deciding which type of treatments are best for the patient. In most cases, treatment won’t be necessary until the late teens or 20s.
Two of the most common treatment options for vaginal agenesis include,
 
Self-dilation: Instead of turning to surgery to create a vagina, this device can be placed inside the vagina for hours a day to help stretch the skin and create a vagina.

Surgery: If patients don’t see results with self-dilation then surgery is often the next step. There are a variety of techniques that can be used during a vaginoplasty, and your gynecologist will fully discuss them with you, so you decide together on the ideal surgical technique to provide the optimal results.
 
Your OBGYN will take an active role in providing you and your teen with any needed care, treatment, and support. Your gynecologist can address your concerns, answer your questions and be an advocate for your health.




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